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Prescription Medications for Dog Anxiety


Clomicalm - For Dogs Only

What is Clomicalm
Clomicalm is a tricyclic antidepressant that affects chemicals in the brain thought to be responsible for dog anxiety. This medication comes in a tablet form and is available in 5mg, 20mg and 80mg dosages.

Applications for Clomicalm
Clomicalm should ideally be used in conjunction with other behavioral management tactics to treat and improve the symptoms of separation anxiety in dogs, such as barking, destructive behavior, and in-home elimination.

Common Side Effects of Clomicalm

  • Drowsiness or dizziness
  • Dry mouth and eyes
  • Constipation
  • Panting
  • Mild agitation
  • Weakness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Loss of weight
  • Low appetite

Contraindications for Clomicalm
  • Your dog should be at least six months old to receive Clomicalm.
  • If your dog has a history of seizures, Clomicalm is not an appropriate medication.
  • If you know your dog doesn't tolerate clomipramine or other tricyclic antidepressants, Clomicalm will not be an appropriate medication.
  • If you've used a preventic flea/tick collar within 14 days, your dog should not take Clomicalm.
  • Clomicalm is not safe for male dogs used for breeding.

Other Important Things to Know About Clomicalm
You should stop giving your dog Clomicalm and contact your vet immediately if you notice
  • Hives
  • Difficulty urinating
  • High blood pressure
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Seizures
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Fever
  • Muscle stiffness or weakness
  • Facial swelling

Do not stop giving your dog Clomicalm abruptly if common side effects occur. Talk to your veterinarian if you find that these side effects outweigh the drug's benefits, so that you can work together to find a more agreeable solution.

Clomicalm Drug Interactions
  • MAOI antidepressant, such as Anipryl or Selegiline
  • Insulin
  • Some types of thyroid medications
  • Antihistamines
  • Sedatives
  • Pain relievers
  • Anxiety medications
  • Muscle relaxants

This list is not exhaustive. Disclose all medications, both prescribed and over the counter, to your vet when asking about Clomicalm.


Fluoxetine - For Dogs, Cats & More

What is Fluoxetine
Fluoxetine is the generic form of Prozac. It is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant, and works by blocking the absorption of serotonin in the brain, which results in a reduction of panic, separation anxiety and obsessive-compulsive behaviors. Fluoxetine is available for dogs or cats in 10mg, 20mg and 40mg capsules.

Applications for Fluoxetine
Fluoxetine can be prescribed to dogs and cats by a veterinarian and is used for the treatment of aggression and OCD symptoms such as excessive light or shadow chasing, constant licking or grooming, spinning or pacing.

Common Side Effects of Fluoxetine

  • Sedation
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Runny nose
  • Weight changes
  • Dry mouth

Do not discontinue Fluoxetine if your pet develops these. If you are worried that these side effects outweigh the drug's benefits, schedule an appointment to speak with your veterinarian.

Contraindications for Fluoxetine
  • Not to be used in conjunction with a flea or tick collar.
  • Fluoxetine should not be started if you've recently used MAOI drugs, flea/tick collars and dips, certain anti-anxiety medications, narcotics such as Pentazocine, or tricyclic anti-depressants.
  • Fluoxetine is not for pets who experience seizures or are using medications to manage seizures.
  • Giving aged cheeses to your pet while using Fluoxetine can lead to life-threatening complications.
  • Pets receiving Fluoxetine should be at least six months old.
  • Fluoxetine may not be for lactating or pregnant pets, or pets with diabetes or severe liver disease.

Other Important Things to Know About Fluoxetine
Fluoxetine can be prescribed for a range of behavioral problems linked to depression or anxiety in cats, dogs and even birds, but is currently only FDA-approved for separation anxiety in dogs. If your doctor has prescribed Fluoxetine to treat a condition other than separation anxiety, follow his or her directions very carefully as they may significantly differ from the instructions on the label.

Call your veterinarian immediately if you notice
  • Increased anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Aggression
  • Restlessness
  • Hyperactivity
  • Depression
  • Shivering
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Confusion
  • Loss of balance
  • A peeling rash

These are less common but serious side effects.

Seek emergency care immediately for
  • A sudden skin rash
  • Hives
  • Facial swelling
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Seizures
These are very rare but potentially life-threatening side effects. Other
  • It can take up to one month before the medication becomes effective.
  • Do not stop this medication abruptly unless instructed by your veterinarian.
  • Skipped doses can be given when you remember, unless it is already close to the time for the next dose.
  • In this case, skip the missed dose. Never give two doses at the same time.

Fluoxetine Drug Interactions
  • Medications that cause drowsiness such as allergy medications, pain medications, muscle relaxers, seizure management meds.
  • Other antidepressants, as this can result in too much serotonin accumulation, a potentially life-threatening syndrome. Symptoms of serotonin accumulation are hyperthermia, altered mental state, neuromuscular hyperactivity and autonomic hyperactivity.

This list is not exhaustive, Fluoxetine can interact with a broad range of prescription medications, over the counter treatments and natural supplements. Disclose all medications your pet receives to your vet when asking about Fluoxetine.


Amitriptyline - Dogs, Cats & More

What is Amitriptyline
Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant. It works by restoring balance in various brain neurotransmitters. Amitriptyline is a tablet that's available in 10mg, 25mg and 50mg doses.

Applications for Amitriptyline
This medication is used to treat generalized and separation anxiety in dogs. In cats, it is prescribed to prevent anxiety, excessive grooming and urine spraying. In birds, Amitriptyline can prevent feather picking and other behavioral problems. It can also be used for UTIs in cats and neuropathic pain in animals.

Common Side Effects of Amitriptyline

  • Drowsiness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dizziness
  • Urinary retention
  • Constipation

Contraindications for Amitriptyline
  • Not to be used in conjunction with a flea or tick collar.
  • Amitriptyline should not be started if you've recently used MAOI drugs or flea/tick collars and dips.
  • Tell your veterinarian if your pet is pregnant or lactating.
  • Amitriptyline may not be suitable for geriatric pets or very young pets.
  • Amitriptyline is not for pets who have experienced adverse effects to other tricyclic antidepressants.

Extra caution is required for pets with the following illnesses:
  • Liver disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Asthma
  • Thyroid disease
  • Diabetes
  • Intestinal problems
  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Glaucoma
  • Dry eye
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Seizure disorder
  • Adrenal gland tumors

Other Important Things to Know About Amitriptyline
Skipped doses can be given when you remember, unless it is already close to the time for the next dose. In this case, skip the missed dose. Never give two doses at the same time.
The effects of Amitriptyline can take several weeks to reach their peak effectiveness.
Do not suddenly stop giving Amitriptyline as this will result in withdrawal symptoms.

Contact your veterinarian if your pet experiences any of these less common side effects, but do not suddenly discontinue the medication.
  • Anorexia
  • Vomiting
  • Disorientation
  • Hyper-excitability
  • Diarrhea

Seek immediate medical attention if any of the following side effects arise. These are very rare but potentially life-threatening side effects.
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or face
  • Hives
  • Seizures
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Panting
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Muscle weakness

Your veterinarian may need to monitor your pet regularly for
  • Irregular heart beat
  • Decreased blood cell counts
  • Liver & kidney health
  • Hormonal imbalances

Amitriptyline Drug Interactions
  • MAOIs
  • Medications that cause drowsiness such as allergy medications, pain medications, muscle relaxers, seizure management meds.

This list is not exhaustive, Amitriptyline can interact with a range of medications and supplements. Talk to your veterinarian or pharmacist before giving any prescriptions to your pet.